'Drift' Table in Lacewood & Ebonised London Plane

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'Drift' Table in Lacewood & Ebonised London Plane

1,100.00

The top of this table is initially ebonised with an iron and vingar solution, which colours the London Plane timber a dark grey colour. The surface is then hand carved with a gouge chisel, which takes most of a day and is undertaken in one session, producing a spontaneous and unique pattern. The process reveals the original grain figure of the timber, which contrasts beautifully with the ebonised colouration.

The frame and legs are constructed with half-joints and strengthened with dowels. The choice of materials highlighting the contrast between the grey ebonisation and the wilder Lacewood figure of quarter-sawn London Plane.

Purchase

This table was designed through the London Plane Project, a comprehensive exploration of one material - the timber of the London Plane tree. Restricting my palate to this one tree species, I have designed and made ‘Drift,’ a small collection of wild craft furniture with modernist stylings.

In the last two years I have become fascinated by this ubiquitous London tree, sucking up our pollution and dulling the noise – doing everything for us when alive but as a furniture timber it remains underused.  Between the commission furniture that accounts for the majority of my practice, I have taken the opportunity to comprehensively explore this specific tree species to discover its versatilities and possibilities and have a lot of fun doing it.

My first major work using London Plane was a timber re-use commission for a large residential developer in 2016, making furniture pieces from timber felled on site.  Since then I have explored the material; the young pale tones and the old tea orange brown and everything in between, applying different techniques to produce a variety of tones, textures and forms.  I have steam-bent it, laminated it, burnt it, ebonised it, bleached it, carved it, gouged it, scraped it, wire-brushed it, made dovetail joints, fox tenons, finger joints and lap joints and dowels.